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Apr
22
Frank Ball

Find the Story

Common Problems, Writing Well
0

For every Christian, struggles rage between the problems we face and the solutions we pray for. For the solution to have meaning, the problem must be clearly shown. Think of the problem and solution as mere bookends. Between them, we find our stories.
  Like the disciples caught unexpectedly by high winds on the Sea of Galilee, we begin in fear and finish in faith, because the all-important journey reveals God’s power and grace.

The Problem: Men were about to die.
  The disciples were fishermen, fully aware of the danger. If they drowned, they wouldn’t be the first men to be washed up on the shore.

The Solution: Waking up Jesus in the back of the boat.
  The discovery can’t be known or even imagined at the beginning. Only by going through the experience can they see and believe. After the disciples saw God’s power at work, they realized they could trust the Lord, and that knowledge changed their lives.

The Story: One person’s emotional journey between the problem and the solution.
  The Bible tells what happened (Click Here ), but that’s just news. The depth of story is found in whichever character experienced the greatest transformation. Who was that? Peter, perhaps. To tell his story, we must use our imaginations and describe the struggle.

  Readers want more than news of what happened. Christian writers sometimes jump to the solution too quickly. They miss giving the details that make the problem real, failing to show the depth of frustration in the battle for survival.
  When you share a life-changing experience, slow down and let readers see through your eyes. Let them see the wind and waves of your struggle, feel the rocking of your boat, and hear the panic in your voice.
  Do that, and you’ve found the story.

Apr
18
Frank Ball

Polar Laundromat

Weekend Fun
0

If you were asked to produce a washing machine commercial that makes a lasting impression, what would you write? Something unique. Unexpected. Illustrate how clean the wash will be. Any ideas?

Here’s what Samsung used to advertise their EcoBubble washing machine.

Apr
15
Frank Ball

Smiles, Laughs, and Tears

Common Problems, Writing Well
0

Just as no two fingerprints are alike, no two people act alike. People smile, laugh, and cry, but in each situation, the expressions and sounds are different. We can laugh out of joy or pain. Our smiles may be courteous or degrading. Crying is an outburst of emotion with an unlimited number of causes.
  Conveniently, we write, He smiled. Is that all? What kind of smile? We might want to say something more than She cried or A tear ran down her cheek, or even worse, refer to a flood of tears. These phrases tend to be overworked, so cliché that readers don’t sense the emotions we want. Maybe your first thought is to write, His heart pounded, or It took his breath away.
  Think again. Push yourself to find details that better express emotions. One of the best ways to do that is to collect examples of what bestselling authors have used for smiles, laughs, and tears.

  For a few examples, Click Here .

Apr
11
Frank Ball

Being Different

Weekend Fun
0

One of the hardest, yet most important lessons we can learn, growing up, is that it’s okay to be different. We can never be successful writing like somebody else, so why try?
  We can enjoy the different ways people express themselves, because all of us have our own style.