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Feb
27
Frank Ball

The Bookbook

Weekend Fun
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The apostle Paul wrote Timothy, asking him to bring the books and parchments when he came. Back then, all books were handwritten. About four hundred years later, Gutenberg invented the printing press. Now we can we can store hundreds of books on our our electronic tablets and readers.
  We’ve advanced so much in recent years, we might gain fresh appreciation of the ancient technology.

Feb
24
Frank Ball

Compound Nouns

Common Problems, Writing Well
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A compound noun may be one word, two words, or a hyphenated word. They may be formed by joining a noun with a noun, adjective, verb, preposition, prepositional phrase, or even a verb and a preposition.

  • Adjective & Noun: back yard, blackboard, front door, greenhouse, orange juice
  • Noun & Adjective: mouthful, seaside
  • Noun & Noun: baseball, golf ball, laundry basket, peanut butter, Web page, website
  • Noun & Prepositional Phase: brother-in-law, jack-in-the-box, sergeant-in-arms
  • Noun & Verb: haircut, manmade, mouse trap, sunset
  • Preposition & Noun: overcoat, undertow
  • Verb & Noun: swimming pool
  • Verb & Preposition: check-in, go-between, pickup, passerby

  Spelling with one word, two words, or a hyphenated word is important, especially when the meaning changes. Obviously, a green house is much different from a greenhouse.
  Many two-word nouns become a single-word or hyphenated word when used as an adjective. We need a hyphen when referring to an orange-juice salesman, or we may wonder if our juice salesman has his face painted orange and is selling drinks at a Syracuse football game. We have a backyard (one word adjective) barbeque in the back yard (two-word noun).
  Spell Check isn’t much help in this area, so pay attention and keep your dictionary handy.

Feb
20
Frank Ball

God Bless You

Weekend Fun
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Not everybody knows how to feel blessed by stopping at a fast-food restaurant. Tim Hawkins has a delightful way to show us how to be thankful for such small things.

Feb
17
Frank Ball

Lie or Lay

Common Problems, Writing Well
0

Confusion comes in the way the lie and lay verbs are used in different tenses.
  (1) The verb lie means to tell something that isn’t true. Jack is lying. He lies now, lied yesterday, and has lied more times than one can count.
  (2) Or lie means to be at rest. Jack lies now, lay yesterday, and has lain when tired.
  (3) Lay means to put or place something. If a chicken yields an egg, it lays now, laid yesterday, and has laid an egg almost every day.
  When the grammatically correct verb form doesn’t match what is common in everyday speech, find a different word so readers won’t mistakenly think you wrote incorrectly.

  For more on Shades of Meaning, Click Here
.