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Aug
26
Frank Ball

Story Power

Encouragement
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Randall Wallace says, “When you tell a story the way Jesus told stories, you’re not arguing your philosophy. You’re telling the truth in a way that breaks in on life.”
  He should know. He’s the creative force behind many box-office hits, including Braveheart, We Were Soldiers, and Pearl Harbor. With amazing skill, he writes of loyalty, courage, and commitment.

  At this year’s Christy Awards, he tells his interesting and inspiring story. You will find the forty-minute keynote presentation well worth your time. Click Here.
  For more about Randall Wallace, Click Here.

Aug
22
Frank Ball

Spelling Talent

Weekend Fun
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For twenty-five years, Gordon Kelly hosted radio and TV shows. He became famous for interviewing kids and showing us their amazing creativity. Perhaps you’ve viewed a YouTube clip or are old enough to remember him by his adopted name: Art Linkletter.
  Kids do say the darndest things.
  Later, Bill Cosby carried the banner and introduced six-year-old Dominique Parrish, who had a unique spelling talent.

Aug
19
Frank Ball

Prepositional Verbs

Common Problems, Writing Well
1

Winston Churchill, who was famous for his motivating speeches during World War II, is said to have been chided for ending a sentence with a preposition. He supposedly responded with: “This is the kind of meaningless pedantry up with which I will not put.”
  You may have heard English teachers say that a preposition should never end a sentence. If so, you can scratch that rule as invalid. We need these “prepositional verbs” at times, to express conditions that can be stated in no better way.
  For example, when the room is dark, we need to “turn on” the light. The preposition is a part of the action of the verb and does not begin a prepositional phrase. In dialogue, Mom might say to Johnny, “Would you turn the light on?” This structure is better than writing: “Turn on the light,” because “on” can be misconstrued as the beginning of the prepositional phrase: “on the light.” Obviously, Johnny isn’t being instructed to place himself on the light and turn, which is technically what turning “on the light” might mean.
  For more about prepositional verbs, Click Here.

Aug
15
Frank Ball

Think Snow

Weekend Fun
0

In a Texas summer, snow is a delightful thought. Southern cowpokes want to escape the heat.
  In a Canadian winter, snow is something to be avoided when it piles in drifts around the house and across the driveway.